How To End Your Workday

By June 27, 2017 Business, Resources
How to end your work day on Whiskey and Red

HOW TO END YOUR WORKDAY

You’ve probably heard about that mythical world, often referred to as “work life balance”. A place where you are able to separate your work time with your personal time perfectly and bring balance to the force. Sounds pretty fabulous right?

Of course it does! But if you speak to many small business owners, they’ll most likely say it doesn’t exist, and in many ways they are right.

When you own your own business, it’s personal. No matter how you break it down or separate it out, starting your own company and creating your dream career is emotional. Most of us go to bed each night thinking about it and wake up with business on the mind. That’s normal, and totally ok.

But while accepting that the line between business and personal are rather blurred, setting boundaries in place to help you manage the two areas of your life is important. It’s important to your business that you find ways to step away at the end of the day and unplug, just as it is important to have a start up process in the morning that helps you be as productive as possible while you are working.

Today, we’re addressing that first one, how to end your work day.

Steven and I are partners in every meaning of the word. Not only are we married, but we are business partners and spend our entire day together working. So it’s critical not only to our business, but to our marriage that we find ways to separate our two worlds and find time to spend together that doesn’t involve pitching clients or designing websites.

How To End Your WorkDay

Step 1: Define your working hours. 

Before you can worry about how to end your workday, we need to address how you start your work day too.

Setting established open business hours is a critical element in being able to define a “closing time”. Not only to post on your website so viewers can see your hours, but for yourself. Knowing how much time you have in your work day is important in being able to break down your productivity hours from client time and other administrative time you need to run your business.

If you know that you plan on “opening” shop or being accessible online at 8:00am, that means you need to set aside time for opening activities just like a brick and mortar business. They might open their doors at 10:00am, but anyone who’s worked in the service industries (retail, restaurants, customer service…) know that you show up way before then to get ready. 

So while you plan on sitting down at your computer at 8:00am, that means you’ll want to set “customer” business hours a little later. This same concept goes for the end of your work day.

When a business closes up for the day, they may lock their doors at 5:00pm but just like opening, they usually stick around for at least another hour or so to close up, clean up, and prep for the next business day.

This is where step 2 comes in.

Step 2: Establish a closing routine.

In order to meet your closing goals, we need to set aside time, just like you do when you open, to close up “client time”. A time where you don’t answer any more emails, schedule any more meetings, or start any new projects. A time where your primary focus is saving your work, cleaning up your desk or desktop (or in some cases both) and organize your next morning’s schedule. While you are “technically” still at work during this time, this is your time to focus on how to close up, shut down, and decompress before fully separating from your work day.

Example: For us here at Whiskey and Red, we have an alarm on our phone that goes off at 4:00pm MT. This alarm let’s me know that I have one hour left in my work day, and it’s time to finish up whatever it is I was currently working on.

  • If it’s a logo design, I finish my action, save my current work, and organize any new design files into their proper places.
  • If it’s an email to a client, I finish up that email, send it out, and then check any other emails that might be waiting and craft my responses in draft emails but don’t actually send until my next morning’s “client time”. This lets my clients know when to expect that they’ll have access to me, and when they won’t.  

Now if I’m in the middle of something, it might take me a little to fully finish up, but that’s where our second alarm comes in. 

I have a second alarm set at 4:30pm MT that let’s me know my finishing up time is at an end and I need to prep for tomorrow. At this point, I have 30 minutes left in my day to complete any final touches before I need to totally shut down.

Example: For that final 30 minutes, I’ll…

  • Close out of any programs open on my computer; ex, Photoshop, Illustrator, Basecamp, etc…
  • I’ll clean out my inbox with any un-necessary emails, deleate anything I don’t need, move other’s into folders, and start drafts of emails to go out the next morning.
  • I’ll spend the last 10 minutes with my planner, evaluating what got compleated today, what didn’t, and what’s coming up tomorrow. I then write out my to-do list for the next day, and budget out my working time for various administrative and client based work so that I already know what I’ll be jumping into the next day instead of doing that planning in the morning and missing out on valuable productivity time.

And then, you guessed it, a final alarm at 5:00pm that tells me to log out, close up, and go take a walk.

Step 3: Change of scenery

For us, jumping from one screen to another like our phones or a TV is not really “logging out”. In order to fully decompress, we have to physically change our location and set a daily practice that helps alter our focus away from work and into personal time.

Sometimes that’s taking the dog for a walk, doing a household chore like laundry or grocery shopping, or just simply sitting outside in our back yard with a well deserved glass of wine.

When we first started out, we didn’t have an office, or even a desk to work on so often times our bedroom or living room, and even the kitchen would be converted into an office space. This made “logging out” and ending our work day more difficult. Having a space dedicated to “working” and other spaces dedicated to “not working” is ideal, but if you don’t have these distinct separations between your spaces, this final step of fully changing your scenery is the most important part of closing up your work day.

Step 4: Give yourself some flexibility

While all of these steps sound amazing, I’d be lying if I said we logged out every day at 5:00pm on the dot.

When you run your own business, you are responsible for everything, but know that you aren’t responsible for it RIGHT NOW. It’s up to you to determine when you do or don’t answer emails or phone calls, when you do or don’t work on client projects, and how clients can get in touch with you.

All of these boundaries will help you to maximize our end of day process to get you offline and outside that much faster.

How to end your workday routine worksheet by Whiskey & Red

To help you structure your own closing process, we’ve created an end of day worksheet to for you to outline your own unique end of day routine and help you on your quest toward that mythical land of work life balance.

 

END OF DAY ROUTINE WORKSHEET

Do you have a different way to end your day, or additional steps you find helpful in closing up shop? Share with us in the comments below. 

And if you know someone who could benefit from this post (and let’s be honest, what small business owner doesn’t struggle to end their workday) please, share this post with them and hopefully they can take back their end of workday.

Sincerely,

Julie Harris of Whiskey and Red name signature.

SO, HOW CAN WE HELP YOU BUILD YOUR BRAND?


PHOTO CREDIT: © Death to Stock Photo

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Julie Harris

About Julie Harris

Julie Harris is the founder and lead designer of Whiskey & Red. Based out of Woodland Park, Colorado, Whiskey & Red specializes in small business branding and WordPress website design. They collaborate with small business owners, at all levels of industry, helping them translate their offline business into an online digital experience.

2 Comments

  • Kelly Mahan says:

    Thank you so much for this, it was exactly what I needed! I’ve been struggling to separate work from personal life and this will help me out tons. Thanks again!!

  • Laura Tirado says:

    I ❤️ this article because it’s a “version” of what I do and it gives me more of a push to maximize my time and give more time to myself and my son and my Puggle 🐶. I am just starting out. And my first client is amazing and I’m absorbed. I’m having a hard time remembering to take time to treat MYSELF like my clients, as far as social media. I still haven’t finished my website! I would love it if you would follow me @chicandsocial on all the platforms! Any suggestions for focusing more on myself? Can’t wait to launch the rebrand of this first client. Thanks again for the article.

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